The January 2019 Issue of Substance

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We were forced to suspend subscriptions to our print edition a year ago, and after wishing we could get back into print have finally admitted that we can only continue as an online publication. Therefore, readers can no longer subscribe to Substance on paper, but those who wish to donate will be thanked.

Stories and tributes about George Schmidt available on October 2018 Substance homepage

The October 2018 Substance News homepage is devoted to stories and comments about editor George N. Schmidt, who died on Sept. 17, 2018. Stories about George’s personal life appear on the left column of the . . .


John Dewey's Educational Creed (posted on Substance, Jan. 11, 2018)

It's been years since the logo of the Chicago Union Teacher newspaper (now a magazine) included words from John Dewey, and there was never an explanation of why those words were removed.
But as . . .


While illuminating major problems with CTU practices, Joseph McDermott's officer slating survey responses for CORE show his qualifications

Serious ethical lapses, violations to the constitution and irregular political practices of the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) leadership are evident in a letter to CORE (Caucus of Rank and File Educators) members and survey responses . . .


Report of the CTU’s House of Delegates meeting held on January 9, 2019


The pre-meeting open mike Question and Answer period began on time at 4:15 p.m..

1. A delegate stated that the only productive time at the House meetings were in the pre-meeting Q and . . .


Chicago Teachers Union failed to pay staff pension payments in 2018 and 2017

In an accidental investigation of the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) finances, Substance News has uncovered through Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests that pension payments to the Chicago Teachers Pension Fund (CTPF) for CTU staff . . .


Norm-referenced tests still being used to make high-stakes decisions

Setting up many students for failure, the Chicago public schools uses the NWEA Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) as a high-stakes test. It’s impossible for all test takers to score well. Despite being reasonably well-informed . . .


We were forced to suspend subscriptions to our print edition a year ago, and after wishing we could get back into print have finally admitted that we can only continue as an online publication. Therefore, readers can no longer subscribe to Substance on paper, but those who wish to donate will be thanked.

Contact Substance | Suggestions (email)