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New Labor Beat video features Substance, CORE, protests against Duncan and Obama policies

A new video by Chicago's Labor Beat features the most dramatic critiques to date from Substance and CORE of Arne Duncan's praxis in Chicago and plans for the public schools of the USA in the future.

You can access the video at

http://blip.tv/file/2428857

The 28 minute video is described as follows at Labor Beat:

Jackson Potter (CORE) is interviewed outside Chicago's Hyatt Regency Hotel in the foreground, while Julie Woestehoff (PURE) is being interviewed in the middle distance as Kenzo Shibata (CORE) is interviewed in the background during the demonstration against Arne Duncan's Hyatt breakfast appearance for "Advance Illinois." Some of the pickets are visible on the right. The demonstration is part of one of the more dramatic moments in the latest Labor Beat video, which features the threat by Hyatt security to arrest Potter and others when they tried to enter the hotel to talk with U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. Substance photo by George N. Schmidt.Before President Obama appointed Arne Duncan Secretary of Education, Duncan was the CEO of the Chicago Public Schools. Under his control there, Chicago Public Schools endured a relentless wave of privatization, school closings, militarization, union busting and blaming teachers for the problems of urban schools. Now, the war on public education pursued during the Bush administration will only continue and intensify under the new Secretary of Education Duncan. His Chicago Plan, as former teacher and editor of Substance News George Schmidt explains, is the template for a national strategy to dismantle public education. Through revealing footage and comments from Chicago teachers, this video shows the resistance that has been growing among teachers and community organizations.Here is a national alert for everyone who cares about the future of public schools, threatened now by Arne Duncan and his corporate vision for the nation's school systems. 28 minutes. Produced by Labor Beat. Labor Beat is a CAN TV Community Partner. Labor Beat is a non-profit 501(c)(3) member of IBEW 1220. Views are those of the producer Labor Beat. For info: mail@laborbeat.org, www.laborbeat.org. 312-226-3330. For other Labor Beat videos, visit Google Video, YouTube, or blip.tv and search "Labor Beat".

It is also available from Labor Beat, a link to which is now on the side of the Substance Home Page to the right. 

Final edited version of this article posted at www.substancenews.net August 4, 2009, 7:00 a.m. CDT. If you choose to reproduce this article in whole or in part, or any of the graphical material included with it, please give full credit to SubstanceNews as follows: Copyright © 2009 Substance, Inc., www.substancenews.net. Please provide Substance with a copy of any reproductions of this material and we will let you know our terms — or you can take out a subscription to Substance (see red button to the right) and make a donation. We are asking all of our readers to either subscribe to the print edition of Substance (a bargain at $16 per year) or make a donation. Both options are available on the right side of our Home Page. See "CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE" or "CLICK HERE TO DONATE." For further information, feel free to call us at our office at 773-725-7502.



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