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THE STRIKE IN SONG AND DANCE: Cultural explosion continues... 'When there's a contract, call me maybe' performed by striking Chicago teachers... and another link to 'Chicago Teacher' the rap performed by Rebel Diaz

One of the most pleasant experiences to come out of the strike and the picket lines is the explosion of creativity from CTU members and supporters. Several videos and the powerful Rebel Diaz rap song are already exploding on the air. One that was brought again to everyone's attention on the morning of September 19, 2012 is "When there's a contract call me maybe". The URL for those who can't get the link is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqXmX5caH7k&sns=fb

The beginning. At ten p.m. on September 9, 2012, the negotiating teams of the Chicago Teachers Union announced that the negotiations with the Chicago Board of Education had failed and the union was calling the first strike in 25 years. The strike began in song two hours later at midnight in front of CPS headquarters. Above, Chicago Teachers Union President and Vice President Karen Lewis and Jesse Sharkey announce that schools will not be in session on September 10, 2012. Arrayed around the two are the union's negotiators, including the members of the "big bargaining team" which was present at the sessions beginning in August 2010, when the concept was introduced, and escalating from November 2011 on, when the first of what became more than 90 bargaining sessions took place. Substance photo by George N. Schmidt.The video had already been viewed more than 31,000 times by the day Chicago strikers returned to their classrooms and other school jobs.

For anyone who missed the initial posting of Rebel Diaz's "Chicago Teacher," the URL is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yN7cRZP58k&feature=related



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